Saturday, May 13, 2006

Genealogy Encyclopedia

Genealogy Encyclopedia
When tracing an ancestry it is common to encounter records filled with obsolete, archaic, or legal terms that can be difficult to interpret. Misinterpreting these terms can make the difference between linking persons to the right generation, parents, spouse or children. Understanding exactly what is stated in any record is vital before attempting to move to the next generation. Inexperienced or impatient genealogists undervalue the quality of their research by applying present-day definitions to documents created in an earlier century. Take the time to use the glossaries provided here and other excellent dictionaries, genealogical reference books and encyclopedias to interpret documents correctly.

Includes the following:
- Abbreviations: These are those most commonly used in genealogical records. It is not unusual to find, within the pages of one record, different variations used, but care should be taken to ensure that in these instances, it is a variation and not meant to indicate something else.
- Censuses: This describes what is listed on the census forms in each of the census years. Few, if any, records reveal as many details about individuals and families as do government census records. Substitute records can be used when the official census is unavailable.
- Illnesses: This describes the various old time Illnesses and Diseases that you will find in old documents, medical records or listed as causes of death on old death certificates or in old family Bibles.
- Occupations: This following list that describes the various old occupations of which many are archaic. These are useful to genealogists since surnames usually originated from someone's occupation. Ships passenger lists, census returns and other documents used in genealogy may give an ancestor's occupation, this list gives more modern interpretations of those terms. They also are useful to historians in general. The list is by no means complete.
- Terms: This page defines the Genealogical Terms used in genealogical research you will find in documents
- Nickname Meanings
- Worldwide Epidemics
- Tombstone Symbols
- Forms

This is in addition to another Encyclopedia of Genealogy (eogen) by Dick Eastman

DNA for Genealogists

Relative Genetics : Make your past your present to the future.: "DNA for the Genealogist" - Information on Autosomal DNA, which are the 22 pairs of non-sex chromosomes found in the nucleus. Autosomal DNA testing will perform a scan throughout all your chromosomes to find the answer to your genealogical question. The benefits of autosomal testing are that you can verify/establish nuclear family relationships, there are no gender limitations, and you can test directly for a certain relationship, e.g. grandparent or sibling. The limitation of autosomal testing is that currently you can only test relationships as far back as the grandparent generation.

Friday, May 12, 2006

OHGEN - Tools for Genealogy Researchers

OHGen.net is full of History and Genealogy Tools for Genealogy Researchers

There is a great deal of information which can be found on the website listed above to those who know how to search it. Using the FamilySearch's Family History Library Catalog's county batch record numbers is a quick way to figure out if your ancestors record is located at a county courthouse in most states. The LDS church members have voluntarily traveled around the country and microfilmed available courthouse and church records and made them searchable online. On this site is listed the batch record numbers by county which are to the indexes for these microfilmed records. Basic information is provided for each record. You can use the information to order a copy of your ancestors record from a family history library near you or a specific county courthouse as the volume of the probate record is often listed. Try many different spellings for your ancestors surnames as courthouse clerks often mispelled first and last names.

Wednesday, May 10, 2006

ProQuest is in a fight for survival

ProQuest is the parent company for HeritageQuest Online. It provides online databases for use in academic and commercial environments. ProQuest does not sell its services to individuals. Instead, its customers are libraries and large corporations.

ProQuest provides many large databsaes, including dissertations, old newspapers, women's studies, law, science and much more. The company is best known in genealogy circles for its HeritageQuest Online product.

HeritageQuest Online provides:


U.S. Census records - actual images of all U.S. census entrties from 1790 through 1930
Books - digitized images of more than 20,000 family and local history books. Each word in every book is searchable.
PERSI - an online database of more than 1.6 million genealogy articles published ih the past 150+ years.
Revolutionary War Era Pension & Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files. This databse includes images of each hand-written application.
Freedman's Bank Records - includes images of the records of the Freedman's Bank, in operation from 1865 through 1874. This bank was founded to serve African-Americans.
For more information, see HeritageQuestOnline. Also: A most valuable service.

United States Vital Records

Our History and Genealogy Tools for Genealogy Researchers

There is a great deal of information which can be found on the website listed above to those who know how to search it. Using the county batch record numbers is a quick way to figure out if your ancestors record is located at a county courthouse in most states. The LDS church members have voluntarily traveled around the country and microfilmed available courthouse and church records and made them searchable online. Included on this site is a list of the batch record numbers by county which are to the indexes for these microfilmed records. Basic information is provided for each record. You can use the information to order a copy of your ancestors record from a family history library near you or a specific county courthouse as the volume of the probate record is often listed. Try many different spellings for your ancestors surnames as courthouse clerks often mispelled first and last names.

BYU Family History Site

This is a great Family History Resource : Be sure to check out the PAF Tutorial.